Review: Door County Brewing Silurian Stout

By Ryan Urban

It’s rare that I remember the first time I had a specific beer. But I remember the first time I had Silurian Stout by Door County Brewing Company.

I was watching Super Bowl XLVIII in 2014 at a bar called the Court N’ House—it was near the court house—in Eau Claire.

As an avid Packer fan, I had no reason to root for either team, and just wanted to see a good game. But the bartender asked me to pick a side—there were orange or green Jell-O shots on the line, depending which team scored.

I bet on Denver, which proceeded to get blown out by the Seahawks 43-8. One shot. Thanks, Peyton. The game was… forgettable.

But one beer was not!

Dark, nice tan head served in a weizen glass. Vanilla is apparent on the nose, but subtle enough on the tongue. Sweet and creamy, almost a peanut butter quality, but dark chocalaty, toasty malts held their own—unlike the Broncos.

I began seeing Door County on the shelves shortly after that. With other great beers in the Door County lineup—Polka King Porter, Pastoral Saison, Le Printemps Saison, L’automne Biere De Garde, etc.—the Baileys Harbor brewery has since grown to the point that it is contracting much of its brewing to Octopi, down state in Waunakee, Wisconsin.

I’m not sure where Silurian—a reference to the Silurian Period when the Great Lakes were a much larger inland sea—is brewed currently, but it’s still as tasty as I remember back in 2014.

It would be a good choice once again alongside some bar peanuts and friends when New England and Atlanta play this Sunday. If I can’t pick a winner in the game, I can at least pick one on tap.

Rating: Glass – Growler – CASE – Keg

Pour one out for 2016, fill a glass for 2017

by Ryan Urban

The year 2016 won’t go down as a favorite in my book, but it did have some redeeming qualities—one being in beer.

Where to begin? I figure: Close to home.

In the craft beer desert of Rice Lake, Wisconsin, we finally have a place to get a decent beer. Opening in June was the White Stag, which also has awesome food and allows me to live my dream of playing trivia master once a month. In the vast world of beer, this is the biggest to me.

One needs a local watering hole, a place everybody knows your name–if you will. Every time I walk in, I see friends and also meet new people. After 6 years in a small city, this was well over due.

Soon, hopefully, local options will grow. Another taproom is nearing completion and, though setback-laden, there are plans to open a brewery in Rice Lake.

Elsewhere, the word uttered more and more is saturation. America now has more than 5,000 breweries, finally surpassing the number open prior to prohibition. But signs of an apex are showing.

A Wausau brewer noted it recently. The owners of Minneapolis brewery Harriet also used the term in explaining a decision to close. I just happened to stop at Harriet shortly before the announcement. Super chill atmosphere, live music and very good beer—I was surprised.

But in a market of many great breweries, some are bound to fall. I have an almost constant desire to make the 2-hour drive to the Twin Cities and hit a taproom or two. Many expansions in the metro give me hope that more may distribute here. Some that really caught my attention in 2016 were Urban Growler, Fair State, Sisyphus, Bauhaus… But there are so many I have yet to visit… sigh.

But I would be remise not to mention the great things happening in the Chippewa Valley. In Eau Claire, though Northwoods Brew Pub went south to Osseo, Lazy Monk opened a fantastic taproom and the Brewing Projekt finally appears to be on track to a major expansion. Brewster Brothers became neighbors with Leinie’s in Chippewa Falls. Even Cornell has brewery now. New distribution into northern Wisconsin from great brewers like Bent Paddle was also a big plus.

Looking at Wisconsin as a whole, the big action is taking place in Milwaukee. There’s a beer renaissance happening there big enough to attract the North American Guild of Beer Writers to hold its annual conference there in 2017, which I’m really looking forward to.

Mobcraft hopped ship from Madison, where the opening of Lone Girl and Rockhound brewpubs still produced a net increase in options in the Capital.

But back to Milwaukee—I enjoyed visits to Brenner, Urban Harvest and Good City in 2016. Good City appears to be well on its way, already distributing its Motto Mosaic-hopped pale ale. Breweries like 3rd Space, Westallion, City Lights, Broken Bat, Big Head, Like Minds and others give me much to look forward to in 2017.

All the same, it’s the veterans of the industry that I keep going back to. Lakefront’s My Turn series was a highlight at my local liquor store all year, with Evan Mexican Lager, Howard Helles and Latif double chocolate stout. Summit had a phenomenal 30th Anniversary lineup, including the Keller Pils, English Barleywine, Us & Them threads and Unchained Dark Infusion. The old standbys from Lakefront, Summit, Bell’s, New Glarus, Sierra Nevada and other craft beer pioneers are still among my favorites and constantly in my fridge.

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Nationwide, big mergers caught headlines as InBev bought up SAB Miller, a couple craft brewers and homebrew mainstay Northern Brewer. Craft brewers Cigar City and Oskar Blues; and Victory and Southern Tier formed new ties.

Hop bombs, sours and barrel-aged beers—and combinations therein–remain ever popular, but more traditional styles like the Pilsner seem to be regaining respect as more new breweries release their own renditions. The year gave rise to the crowler as another awesome way to get beer from the brewery to the fridge.

I’m out of analysis and prognostications. Simply stated: What a great year for beer! The glass is full for 2017, and I’m just going to try and enjoy it. Cheers!

Beer Run Episode #7

To listen now, click here. Or enjoy our blog recap first.

Beer Review: Ale Asylum Oktillion

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Not to be confused with this Disney villain—though we didn’t get her name right.

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We talked Oktoberfest variations.

Oktoberfest beer

Drink up the best of Oktoberfestbiers before they’re out of season.

In Brew News:

Self-Driving Truck’s First Mission: A 120-Mile Beer Run
World’s longest pub crawl: Maths team plots route between 25,000 UK boozers
Voldemort buys Northern Brewer and Midwest Supplies

Interview: Isaac Showaki of Octopic/Third Sign.

 

We gave a shout out to our good friends at the Handy Homebrew Show!

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Matt Paulson of the Handy Homebrew Show and our very own Carl Cooley.

Kick back, uncap and listen to our full episode below. Cheers!

Beer Run Episode #5

We had such a great interview with Ryan Verdon of Real Deal Brewing that we couldn’t bear to cut the show down to a half hour. We talk about this Menomonie (WI) nanobrewery’s sessionable English-style beers, as opposed to “Barrel-aged barleywines of death.” Plus, Carl and I review a Porter all the way from Green Man Brewing in Asheville, North Carolina and look back at some classic beer commercials. “It works every time”

Beer Run Episode #3

Episode 3 is up! On this run: Drinking beers in the name of science, beers for Dooms Day bunkers and an interview with Leoš Frank of Lazy Monk Brewing. Listen at beerrunpodcast.com.

Brewery tour of Northwest Wisconsin

The Upper Midwest is not short on diverse, fun beer scenes, whether it’s Madison, Chicago or the Twin Cities. But lesser-known gems shine in the outlying areas too. The beer enthusiast will be hard-pressed to find a better example of a diverse, fun selection of taprooms than those in Northwest Wisconsin.

This article offers a guide to the trendy and timeless taprooms of Northwest Wisconsin in the form of a 4-day tour. Hitting every single one in 4 days is, admittedly, a tall order. In fact, I’d recommend taking a little time away from the taprooms to enjoy Wisconsin’s great outdoors. Hit the brewpubs you missed on a second trip. With dozens charming small towns and miles of beautiful countryside, deep forests and shimmering waters, Wisconsin’s Northwest should be a destination for any beer enthusiast.

Thursday

Start off at the man cave of a taproom at Oliphant Brewing, where a classic movie from the glory days of VHS will be playing on a TV the size of a baby pachyderm. Twelve beers on tap are as colorful as the lizardy mural outside this otherwise-unassuming building in Somerset. The often-rotating selections may include Milkman Manbaby Milk Stout, Mothra vs. Mothra Citra Lager, Eventacles Wee Heavy and other beers flamboyant in both name and flavor.

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Oliphant Brewing taproom.

 

For dinner, head south to Pitchfork Brewing, where patrons can order in from Patty Ryan’s Irish Pub next-door. The building, located off I-94 Exit 4 west of Hudson is bland brick and mortar from the outside, but the Pitchfork taproom features American gothic charm and eight beers on tap, including a firkin. Beer styles are generally more down-to-Earth, well-made classics. Look for Cast Iron Oatmeal Stout, Barn Door Brown Ale and German Straw Pilsner.

Okay, it’s decision time. There’s two more breweries in this area, but four breweries in one night is perhaps overly-ambitious. Luckily, both distribute bottles (Rush River) or cans (Barley Johns). Pick one for a visit, pick a six-pack for the road from the other.

Rush River’s taproom is set alongside shiny tanks in the brewery itself.  There’s 15 taps featuring a rock-solid regular lineup and some more limited offerings. Look for twists on Rush River favorites like Lost Arrow Porter with Raspberry, Boürbon Über Altbier or Nevermore Oatment Stout on Ancho Chili and Cinnamon.

Frustrated with growth-stifling brewpub laws, Barley John’s Brewpub hopped the border from Minnesota to Wisconsin last year. The 15-year-old brand is bigger and better than ever, offering a unique array of brews and canning many for distribution. Try favorites like Old Eight Porter, Amber’s Amber or Wild Brunette Brown Ale.

Oliphant Brewing – 350 Main St, Ste 2, Somerset, WI

Pitchfork Brewing – 709 Rodeo Drive, Hudson, WI

Rush River Brewing  – 990 Antler Ct, River Falls, WI

Barley John’s Brewing Company – 1280 Madison St., New Richmond, WI

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Stephen and Ryan enjoy a hiking beer at Willow River State Park.

Main attractions: St. Croix River, Willow River State Park, Phipps Center for the Arts

Recommended restaurants: Winzer Stube, Stone Tap, South Fork Cafe

Friday

Friday, do lunch in Menomonie. The Raw Deal has small plates and desserts, Lucette has pizza. Eat at one brewery. Drink at two.

Raw Deal is a coffee shop that happens to brew a few beers too—a Scotch Ale, Raw Rye and Organic Pale Ale, to name a few.

Lucette, named for Paul Bunyan’s wife, is the biggest in town and known for its Farmer’s Daughter Blonde Ale, Ride Again Pale Ale, Hips Don’t Lie Hefeweizen and Slow Hand Stout.

Try not to get carried away in Menomonie. More great beers await in Eau Claire.

Start with a full half-liter of Czech Pilsner, Wheat Pivo or Baltic Porter at the Lazy Monk, which opened a new bier hall in January 2016. As the name implies, Lazy Monk offers a laid back atmosphere and well-made, easy-drinking beers like Czech Pilsner, Pivo Wheat and Baltic Porter served in 0.5-liter glasses. Among 14 taps, there’s a few guest taps from other Northwest Wisconsin breweries. Lazy Monk’s spacious taproom has the authentic flavor of Central European bier hall, complete with a brewmaster from the former Czechoslovakia. Leoš Frank moved from a country of cheap, delicious beer to the light adjunct lager-dominated beer scene of 1980s America. The beer sucked, so he didn’t drink any for 10 years. Lucky for him—and us—he discovered homebrewing. He went pro with his skills in 2010 and the rest is history. I think we can all drink to that.

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Prost! at new Lazy Monk taproom.

If Lazy Monk is on one end of the brewery spectrum, The Brewing Projekt is on the other. While Lazy Monk does classic Old World styles, the Brewing Projekt embodies the modern American craft beer attitude of pushing the boundaries. Consider Gunpowder IPA with green tea and citra hops, Stolen Mile with lemon zest and basil, or East Meet West Tripel with candied ginger crystalized ginger and ginger root. Speaking of no boundaries, only rope separates this taproom from the shiny brewing tanks, creating an open, energetic atmosphere. This is a place to treat your taste buds.

Raw Deal – 

Lucette Brewing Company – 910 Hudson Rd, Menomonie, WI

Das Bierhaus – 120 6th Ave W, Menomonie, WI

Lazy Monk Brewing – 97 W Madison St, Eau Claire, WI

The Brewing Projekt – BLDG 3, 2000 N Oxford Ave, Eau Claire, WI

Main attractions: Music/arts scene, Volume One/Local Store, Dells Mill,

Recommended restaurants: Acoustic Cafe , The Nucleus, HouligansRay’s Place

Saturday

Jacob Leinenkugel Brewery is, of course, king in Northwest Wisconsin. Leinie’s has some a solid lineup of classic award-winners like Honey Weiss, Sunset Wheat and Creamy Dark and some higher-ABV Big Eddy creations. But a modern craft beer drinker might find these offerings a little tame—surely one reason the brewery recently began offering hoppier options like India Pale Lager and Pale Ale. Leinie’s has been owned by Miller since 1988, but you wouldn’t know by visiting the brewery. The historical character of Leinenkugels, founded in 1867, is on full display during a $5 tour, which comes with four 4-ounce samples—you keep the glass. But you can’t keep drinking, as it is not a full-service taproom. It’s worth a visit, but optional on this tour. There are many more small town-town, big-character breweries down the road.

Twenty miles up Hwy. 53 is a quaint town called Bloomer, which has its own historic brewery. The Bloomer Brewery history goes back to the 1870s. The original brewery shuttered long ago. But the building remains and owner Dan Stolt has re-kindled life in it with some old-school beers. Beers are made with basic malts, hops and corn as an adjunct, producing some smooth, mellow classics like Cow-Bell Cream Ale, Weathered Brick White IPA and Rut Bock. The taproom is in fact several rooms, adorned with rustic features and old Bloomer breweriana. True to its rural Wisconsin roots, there’s even a room with about three dozen head mounts of whitetail bucks. For a strong taste of rural Wisconsin culture and old-school beer, Bloomer is where it’s at.

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Bloomer Brewery Taproom.

Speaking of old-school, your next must-stop is Valkyrie Brewery in Dallas. Founded as Viking Brewery 21 years ago, the brewery has survived in little Dallas, population 395 and surrounded by some of the prettiest farm country you’ll ever see. The Viking naming rights were sold to an Icelandic brewery 5 years ago, but fun and flavor never left this taproom. Owners Ann and Randy Lee ­­picked the spot based on the quality of the water. The Lees are some of the nicest, most down-to-Earth folks you’ll ever meet. The beers, on the other hand, are also nice but sky high in unique flavor. There’s Raven Queen, a black wheat IPA with licorice, or Blaze Orange, a light lager with orange peel and spices, or Whispering Embers, a smoked Oktoberfest. Less-weird, but also big on flavor are the War Hammer Milk Coffee Porter, Night Wolf Schwarzbier, Big Swede Swedish Imperial Stout and many more. For $1 per 8 ounces, the prices in this Norse-themed taproom—complete with medieval weaponry–can’t be beat. The only bad time to visit is in the 2 months after Christmas, as the taproom is closed. The best time to visit is the first Saturday in October for Dallas Oktoberfest, highlighted by the 100-plus-foot Colossal Brat!

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Valkyrie’s Whispering Embers.

Save some time for a drive deep into the Northwoods and visit the Angry Minnow in Hayward. This brewpub has excellent “Up North cuisine,” making it a great pick for dinner. Wash down that steak or fish fry with a Vienna Lager, Charlie’s Rye IPA or McStuckie’s Scotch Ale.  The best time to visit may be in late February when thousands of Nordic skiers attempt the 30-plus mile Birkebeiner race from Cable to downtown Hayward, made all the more grueling by “Bitch Hill” late in the race. For those who don’t like to suffer for fun, just drink the Bitch Hill Belgian instead.

Jacob Leinenkugel Brewery– 1 Jefferson Ave, Chippewa Falls, WI

Bloomer Brewing Company – 1526 Martin Rd, Bloomer, WI

Valkyrie Brewery – 234 Dallas St, Dallas, WI

Angry Minnow Brewing Company – 10440 Florida Ave, Hayward, WI

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Blue Hills Felsenmeer.

Main attractions: Lake Wissota State Park, The Blue Hills, entire Hayward area

Recommended restaurants: Bohemian Ovens, Main Street CafeNorske Nook, Lehman’s Supper Club, Sawmill Saloon

Sunday

The last two stops on this tour are in the northern extreme of Wisconsin on the shore of the Greatest Lake. Ashland’s South Shore Brewery offers two restaurants—The Alley and Deep Water Grille—for lunch or dinner. The Alley has pizza and the Grille has sandwiches, appetizers, entrées and more. With either option, diners can enjoy a brew from one the oldest brewpubs in the state, started in 1995. South Shore recently opened a second tasting room a few miles north in Washburn. At either location, visitors will find an excellent, low-ABV lineup with favorites like Nut Brown, Inland Sea Pilsner and Rhoades’ Scholar Stout. South Shore is no doubt one of the classic brewpubs in the state, and well-worth the drive up to Lake Superior.

Well, we’ve saved perhaps the best for last with Thirsty Pagan in Superior. Come hungry. With several sandwich and deep dish pizza options on the menu, you won’t leave that way. Beverage options are plentiful in this taproom brimming with charm of old-school breweriana. Highlights of seven year-round offerings include the Burntwood Black Ale, Velo Saison and Trouble-Maker Tripel. Thirsty Pagan also specializes in sour beers, keeping at least two on tap. But wait: there’s more! You’ll also find a handful of seasonal specialties like the Pinta Colada Coconut Stout, Mustache Wax Doppelbock or Bourbon Barrel Aged Barleywine. With live music every night, there’s no bad time to bring your appetite and your thirst.

 

Wisconsin’s Great Northwest is dotted with one-of-a-kind breweries, both old and new. The beers are just as distinct and enjoyable as the settings. Many have great amenities in food and entertainment. Plus, proximity to some of the most beautiful recreational lands in the country make this corner of the state well-worth a visit for any beer drinker. See for yourself.

South Shore Brewery – 808 Main St W, Ashland, WI

Thirst Pagan Brewing – 1623 Broadway St, Superior, WI

Main attractions: Apostle Islands, Copper Falls State Park, Chequamegon National Forest

Recommended restaurants: Breakwater Restaurants, Delta Diner

Region-wide activities: Road Biking, Mountain Biking, Paddling, Boating, Fishing, Hiking, Camping, Golfing, Disc Golfing, Snowmobiling, ATV riding, Geocaching, Downhill skiing, Cross Country Skiing, Snowshoeing

Beer Run Podcast Episode #2

On this episode, we guess what beers presidential candidates are drinking,  review 3 Sheeps First Kiss pale ale and discuss few other Wisconsin breweries and a few more in Duluth, MN. Cheers!

A six pack of Wisconsin stouts for International Stout Day

Today, Nov. 5, is International Stout Day, a celebration of one of the best loved beer styles in the world. The day is comes as the fields brown, the forests bare their branches and the nights grow longer and darker here in Wisconsin. Thankfully, this state’s breweries understand the yearning for a roasty, chocolaty treat. I drink dark beers all months of the year, but I definitely make a point to stock up on the black beauties for winter. Here’s what I’m reaching for today, tomorrow or in April because these dark ales are delicious.

South Shore Rhoades’ Scholar Stout

South Shore Brewery has served up this Wisconsin stout lover’s favorite for much of the Ashland brewery’s 20-year history. Coming in at 6.1% ABV, this beer carries a velvety mouthfeel and chocolaty sweetness. This is one of the oldest stout brands in Wisconsin, and few rival its flavor even today.

Stone Arch Vanilla Stout

If anything complements the roasty, chocolaty malt of a stout, it’s vanilla. This Appleton brewery uses natural vanilla to produce a 5% ABV oatmeal stout. Many vanilla stouts are too heavy on the vanilla, but this one is just right. The subtle vanilla melds with the caramely, chocolaty nature of this beauty.

Sand Creek Oscar’s Oatmeal Stout

Sand Creek Brewery’s oatmeal stout is true to form with this strong-bodied 4.5% brew. There’s a rich nutty, chocolaty taste and enough hop presence to balance the delightful sweetness. This is easily the best brew you’ll find in this Black River Falls brewery’s homey taproom or your hometown bottle shop.

Lucette Slowhand Stout

Stout is all about the malt. Lucette takes this notion to the next level with Slowhand. There’s little to no flash of hops in this beer. It’s all roasty coffee dryness on a creamy body, packing a modest 5.2% ABV. Like many of this Menomonie brewer’s creations, Slowhand is a distinct beer and a wonderful take on this iconic style.

Milwaukee Brewing Company Polish Moon

We can’t talk about stouts in Wisconsin without mentioning a milk stout. This Milkwaukee brewery makes a fine one. Brewed with a well-portioned dose of milk sugar, this dark, silky beer has extra sweetness yet remains quite drinkable at 4.5% ABV. Like the namesake clock on Milwaukee’s heavily-Polish south side, this stout is a landmark in Milwaukee.

Central Waters Brewers Reserve Bourbon Barrel Stout

There isn’t a style of beer that stands up better to the bite residing in the wood of a bourbon barrel. Amherst’s Central Waters harnessed the wonders of barrel aging a decade ago. It’s flagship in this project is this stout aged in oak barrels. At 9.5% ABV, it packs a punch but less of one than similar barrel-aged stouts. While boozy, the oak and vanilla flavors this beer produce a savory treat.